Trying hard not to lose it but at the same time losing some #cycling

I love my bike, yes, it’s not worth a great deal now, but it would cost a bomb (~£2000) to replace with a new one and they aren’t easy to get hold of second hand.
So for the past 12 months I’ve been carrying a Kryptonite New York STD lock on the back of my rack as well as my older Abus lock so I could lock safely both at home and at work (see my other post). I cringe when I think I used to only use the Abus lock, I was lucky it wasn’t stolen. Anyway, these locks aren’t light, so I decided to splash out on a new couple of locks to leave at work so that I won’t need to carry locks back and forth.

The Kryptonite New York Fahgettaboudit Mini lock (£57.64 from fatbirds.co.uk):

It is mini, not much room to fit it, the post I’m locking too isn’t very big and this is a tight fit as it is. But it is a beast of a (mini) lock.

And the Kryptonite New York STD lock (£48.58 from fatbirds.co.uk – way cheaper than the first one I bought 12 months ago, that cost £75 from Wiggle!)

A total overkill for the front wheel, I kind of regret buying it as the front wheel only cost a fraction more than the lock, but it’ll deter a thief even further I guess.

I also found a good site about bicycle security called lockyourbike.org.

Lock it, keep it, ride it.

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12 responses to “Trying hard not to lose it but at the same time losing some #cycling

  1. Very impressive security, but haven’t you forgotten something? One of the main reasons I carry my lock, is simply if I have a problem, I can lock the bike somewhere and come back for it, or if I want to pop into a shop I can be sure it’ll still be outside when I’m ready to go.

    • I’m paranoid more like 🙂

      In two years of cycle commuting I’ve only gone into a shop once, for them to fix a puncture (I had given up on trying to get the culprit out of the tyre) and the bike went in with me. I never leave my bike anywhere if I have a problem, I fix the problem or limp home or to work, I’ve not had to, but the mobile phone is a backup option.

      However, I do have a cheap bike at home for nipping to the shops (I normally walk though) and I can use my cheap lock on that.

      If I take my good bike anywhere (but work) and I plan on stopping then I take my locks that I lock it up in the shed with, the old Kryptonite New York STD and Abus, so yes, I’m covered for that.

      • I’ve yet to actually leave my bike anywhere when I’ve had a problem, a couple of times it’s meant a very long walk home, or the mobile to call for rescue. My son did it once, he hid his bike in some bushes, and was able to return and find the bike OK. That would be my preferred option, but it’s difficult to find bushse in an urban area, that are suitable.

  2. I’d worry that someone seeing 2 huge locks on your bike would get the idea it might be worth something! Let’s face it, it’s not the most shiny, carbon fibred up bike in the world. They might even go and research Rolhoffs!

    When I do long rides, I’ve not got a small cable lock for the shop option. There have been several times in the past when I didn’t take a lock and really would have liked to buy a mars bar! Seems many “proper” audax riders don’t lock up their 2k bikes, but frankly, I’m not that trusting.

    • I think most (if not all) high end bike thieves will know what my bike is.
      The low end thieves won’t touch the locks and are after easy picking mountain bikes mostly anyway. But I’m just theorising here.

  3. Hi Tim, great blog.

    A good friend of mine has the Fahgettaboudit lock and he swears by it. I use a Master Lock the police gave me for free (which is pretty good, actually) with a Kryptonite cable that I run through both wheels and the frame before shackling the bike to whatever solid object I can find.

    I guess I’m quite lucky in that I have a really secure place to keep my bike at work and at home but I think you’ve got it right about the deterrent being enough to move the opportunist onto something easier to steal. You’d hope that anyone recognising how valuable your bike actually is would also be the kind of person who wouldn’t consider stealing it in the first place or, at the very least, recognise the quality of your locks and just keep walking.

    • Hi Jimmy, glad you like it, there’s heaps more to do on it, but it’s starting to shape up nicely. I like the fact that occasionally I flip back to my old posts to read about something I’ve forgot about.

      Cyclingcoder once saw how quickly someone snapped one of those Kryptonite cables. They are fine for securing wheels, but I’d make sure my frame is secured with something better.

      They say that if a thief really wants your bike then he/she will take it. But they also say that a thief will take easy pickings if there are any, so make your bike harder to steal than the others and they make just take someone elses instead.

  4. I think that’s absolutely right; if they want it bad enough, they’ll take it. I suppose it’s about striking a balance between buying an expensive and potentially heavy lock and doing enough to provide a deterrent.

    I was staying away from work in Bristol not long ago and needed munchies and batteries for my lights (I was heading out exploring the Bristol – Bath railway bed) and just wheeled my bike into Tesco’s with me! The security guy started giving me hassle until I said “I’m just not leaving it outside!” at which point he actually offered to stand there and keep an eye on it. Bizarre change of heart.

    • I’ve often thought about, and then chickened out, walking into a supermarket with my bike, instead of locking it outside. Next time I will try it, it makes sense, thanks for the tip.

    • Supermarket security staff; I wont publicly air my feelings on them LOL
      All I will say is that I do not cooperate with them, I think I know my rights, which is good enough for me.
      In this case maybe he thought you’d complain and he’d get in trouble, anyway, thanks for distracting him, I made off with hundreds of pounds worth of carrots while he was watching your bike.

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